Amazon Music Ending Cloud MP3 Storage, Streaming Option

Amazon Music Ending Cloud MP3 Storage, Streaming Option

Amazon Music Ending Cloud MP3 Storage, Streaming Option

Amazon Music Ending Cloud MP3 Storage, Streaming Option

Amazon Music will end its streaming support for users’ uploaded MP3 in 2019, the service announced this week with a statement on its website.

Amazon Music Storage subscription plans, which let users upload music from their Mac or PC and stream them alongside the in-app on-demand and radio options, will be accepted until Jan. 15, 2018. Then, the service will run until January 2019, when it will be removed entirely.

As of Monday this week, free plans — which allow for 250 songs to be stored in the cloud — are no longer able to upload new music to their MP3 locker.

Existing subscribers of the paid 250,000-song plan — or newcomers signing up or upgrading before that Jan. 15 dates — will retain the ability to upload new music to their account until the service is disabled in 2019. Subscriptions cost $24.99 a year.

The changes will only impact music that’s been imported. Tracks purchased from Amazon as MP3 or via AutoRip from CDs will remain available for playback and download.

Amazon Music Ending Cloud MP3 Storage, Streaming Option

Read More Here

Article Credit: Billboard

Go to Source

Alibaba Cloud is opening its first data center in India

Alibaba Cloud is opening its first data center in India

Alibaba Cloud is opening its first data center in India, Alibaba is bringing its cloud computing business into India as it continues to expand its fast-growing business unit.

The Chinese firm said today that its first data center on Indian soil will come online in January and be based out of Mumbai. The business already has clients in India, but a local presence will allow it to better service customers in the country, it added.

Beyond offering standard cloud products — like large scale computing, storage and big data capabilities — India-based customers will get access to elastic computing, database, storage and content delivery, networking, analytics and big data, containers, middleware, and security.

The new center will give Alibaba Cloud 33 availability zones, which covers regions including China, Hong Kong, Singapore, Japan, Australia, the Middle East, Europe, and the U.S..

“As we build out the Alibaba Cloud network globally, India is another important piece that is now firmly in place. This continues our commitment to India, helping it to develop trade opportunities with other markets in the region and beyond,” Simon Hu, Senior Vice President of Alibaba Group and President of Alibaba Cloud, said in a statement.

Alibaba previously revealed plans for the India data center — and another in Indonesia — in June.

Earlier this year, we wrote that Alibaba is aiming to compete with the likes of AWS, Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud in the long run. For now, it is seeing most of its traction in China, but revenue is increasing at the rate of nearly double for every quarter this year.

Alibaba Cloud hit net sales of RMB 3 billion ($447 million) in the most recent quarter, up from RMB 2.4 billion in the previous three-month period when it hit one million customers for the first time. Overall, the cloud computing business recorded a RMB 697 million loss, or negative $105 million, which it put down to investment in R&D having nearly reached breakeven in the previous quarter.

India is also a key focus for Alibaba generally. The company has invested heavily in payment and e-commerce firm Paytm — helping it push into digital banking services, as Alibaba affiliate Ant Financial has done in China — so it makes sense that Alibaba Cloud is also putting focus there.

In evidence of its global focus, Alibaba Cloud made its first investment outside of China last month when it led a $27 million round for open source startup MariaDB.

Read More Here

Article Credit: TechCrunch

Go to Source

what is a vCIO (Virtual CIO)

What is a vCIO (Virtual CIO)?

what is a vCIO (Virtual CIO)

what is a vCIO (Virtual CIO)

what is a vCIO (Virtual CIO)? The vCIO collaborates with and counsels customers’ IT departments and performs the very same functions as a traditional CIO.

The vCIO will help clients keep their IT infrastructure keeping the lights but may also supply more-forward appearing services. If a customer lacks an internal IT department or has quite a limited IT staff, the customer may grant broader decision-making power and technologies installation responsibilities to the vCIO.

The most important difference between this vCIO function along with other specialized advisory services is the vCIO requires a wider view of their customer, focusing on business and IT alignment.

Pricing arrangements vary, however, a virtual CIO normally charges based on an hourly fee or a flat fee.

The flat fee functions as a subscription, with the client paying for the vCIO’s providers on a daily basis, or occasionally at another frequency. The flat-fee approach looks like the services provider (MSP) version and, so, some MSPs do provide vCIO services.

IT consulting companies may also give virtual CIOs. Additionally, stores or solutions providers can informally promote themselves as virtual CIOs for their small-business clients, even though the businesses don’t necessarily recognize that support as an official field of business.

Virtual CIOs may discover functions among small and midsize companies (SMBs), which generally are not able to pay for a conventional CIO’s payment package. The vCIO might offer cost-avoidance benefits in a few ways, based on the pricing arrangement.

A virtual CIO service provided in an hourly-rate foundation becomes an “on demand” capacity and a variable price. The customer organization brings from the vCIO to consult on technology choices just as needed. This strategy is generally less costly than paying for a full-time CIO’s salary and benefits. After the service provider supplies a flat rate, the CIO purpose might be bundled inside a wider managed services program rather than existing as a separate budget item.

While cost avoidance is 1 advantage of a virtual CIO, clients can discover other benefits too. On the human resources side, the client avoids the time-consuming and possibly expensive process of choosing a CIO. The accessibility of 24/7 service is just another incentive for working with an electronic CIO; this is when a firm staffed with a number of advisers filling the vCIO function is also called upon.

A virtual CIO can also provide increased objectivity because they could be subject to a company’s internal politics.

The expression “virtual CIO” is interchangeable with “outsourced CIO,” because the purpose may be referred to as. But “outsourced CIO” more frequently describes the main investment officers.

In inclusion, a digital CIO might be known as a “fractional CIO,” who supplies their services for a fraction of the cost and time a full-time CIO needs. Under all three conditions, CIO is regarded as a part-time job as opposed to a fulltime position.

Now this question (what is a vCIO (Virtual CIO)) will not bother you anymore.

EIN ORIGINAL

Go to Source

Intelligent disobedience can mitigate dangerous IoT situations

A friend of mine works with puppies being trained as guide dogs for the blind. She had her daughter help her choose a pup’s name. “What about Jarvis?” she suggested. When asked why, the girl seemed astounded that her mother hadn’t already made the connection. “You know. After Tony Stark’s J.A.R.V.I.S. He looks out for Tony. Even though he does what Tony tells him to, there are times he won’t, but he does it for Tony’s own good.” I had to chuckle at how readily today’s generation understands artificial intelligence and sees how it can be applied to help humankind. It made me wonder, can intelligent disobedience in IoT work similarly?

Intelligent partnerships can increase safety

Guide dogs are trained to obey their master’s commands. However, intrinsic to a seeing eye dog’s training is a behavior termed “intelligent disobedience.” Intelligent disobedience occurs when a service animal goes against the owner’s instructions in an effort to make a better decision. The behavior is built into their training and is essential to a service animal’s success on the job.

Imagine, for instance, a blind man who walks the same path every day. He is familiar with points where he needs to cross the street. His better developed senses of smell and hearing help him understand things like traffic and crowds. He can make appropriate decisions. However, not everything can be foreseen. A surprise may await him around a corner that he had never before encountered. The dog, which sees what the owner does not, is able to perceive the danger and disobey the command to move forward.

When the IoT system knows more than you do

This sort of behavior may be similarly beneficial in the world of IoT, with its AI and machine learning. Intelligent systems should be designed to push back on instructions when they are not in the best interests of the job at hand — particularly when there is danger involved.Sensors act as the nervous system of IoT implementations, collecting continuous streams of data to be processed. They supply the data to computers that process it faster than any human can. The intelligence derived through an IoT system should have a broader view than any individual operator. It may see danger faster than it can be perceived by operators and determine that it needs to take necessary precautionary measures. While the operator tells it to do one thing, the system “knows” it is too dangerous to do so. This is when intelligent disobedience can kick in to alert the worker that the original instructions will have negative consequences given the current conditions.

The override switch

Of course, there will be times that the instructions need to be followed in spite of the system’s push back. Imagine again that the blind man comes around the corner and the dog notices two large men with whom he is unfamiliar standing in the way. He stops his master from proceeding forward.

However, when one man speaks, the blind man recognizes the sound of his brother-in-law’s voice and reassures his dog that he is friendly. In this way, the intelligent disobedience has been overridden. Similarly, the operator may know something that the IoT system has no way of knowing. An escalation procedure should be in place so that the worker can countermand the challenge to the request and move ahead with the original instructions.

Read More Here

Article Credit: TechTarget

Go to Source

6 Ways To Get Actionable Insight From Your IoT Data

6 Ways To Get Actionable Insight From Your IoT Data

The number of IoT-enabled devices is growing exponentially. Gartner recently suggested that as many as 3.1 billion IoT devices could already be in use by businesses today. Some estimates even predict that by 2025, the total number could be much higher, exceeding 75 billion. Together they’ll generate an immense amount of data, and companies everywhere are scrambling to get their heads around it and figure out how to make the best use of it.

IoT-enabled devices are already being used for many different applications. In some cases, the data they collect is used to communicate status, such as whether a device is running properly. In other cases, data is used to provide actionable intelligence that helps people (and machines) change their behaviors, or to provide a feedback loop that companies can leverage to improve the functionality and user experience of their products. Regardless of use though, here are six ways your company can make the most use of data gleaned from IoT initiatives.

1) Set A Goal

Even when you’re in discovery mode, it pays to have a goal in mind. At the trial stage, goals could include things like making sure the technology works, confirming whether your solution actually solves a customer problem or flushing out systemic problems that are likely to be an issue as you scale. The track can be loosely defined, but you still want to be able to confirm progress and achieve a result. In the end, you’re looking to make smarter decisions that yield business results.

2) Know Where Your Data Is Coming From

Collecting data from IoT initiatives is part of the challenge. Many different types of IoT devices are used in business settings, including:

  • Industrial control systems that enable centralized control and monitoring in manufacturing environments
  • Commercial wearables like gas detection monitors and police body cameras
  • Sensors and devices that monitor temperature, pressure, humidity and other environmental conditions
  • Location beacons and GPS systems
  • Tablets and other devices running business applications

Beyond devices, data can also come from other sources, including open application programming interfaces (APIs) that connect with other internal and external networks and systems, as well as web data, social networks and traditional media. Regardless of source, to take full advantage of IoT, you have to collect all the data and know where it’s coming from. Only then can you prioritize its usefulness and importance.

3) Solve The Integration Issue

Within a business setting, thousands of different devices could be collecting data simultaneously. While that’s impressive (or frightening, depending on your outlook), the raw data doesn’t bring much value unless you can refine it and put it in context.

In a recent Forbes Insights study, over 500 business leaders were asked to name the biggest challenges their company faced in building out its IoT capabilities. Thirty percent said it was integrating disparate data. When it comes to IoT data, the whole is often greater than the sum of the parts. To maximize its potential, data has to be gathered and transported somewhere where it can be viewed holistically.

Read More Here

Article Credit: Forbes

Go to Source

4 Ways To Overcome The Complexity Of IoT Implementation

4 Ways To Overcome The Complexity Of IoT Implementation

In the consumer space, it is well publicized how nearly every device is becoming smarter and more connected. What receives less attention in mainstream media is the considerable impact the Internet of Things (IoT) is having in the industrial sector. The Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) is already helping enterprises operate more safely and productively while improving efficiency and reducing costs.

While the IoT can offer significant benefits, they can be challenging to implement. Forbes Insights recently surveyed more than 500 executives and, when asked about their greatest challenge in building out their IoT capabilities, 29% said it was the quality of IoT technology. This isn’t surprising. In some cases, IoT platforms must support thousands of vendors, dozens of standards, and be able to scale to millions of devices, together sending and receiving billions of messages.

Challenges With Managing IoT Technologies Today

IoT-based solutions are typically made up of a group of technologies, some already existing and some entirely new. Each has its own path of development, and when they’re combined, they can create an environment that is complex and rapidly changing. Here are four challenges with managing IoT technologies today.

  1. Integrating New Technologies Into Existing Environments

In the era of the smartphone, it may seem as though every machine is connected and sharing information, but that’s not the case. In the consumer world, a mix of technologies are competing for dominance, and standardization remains elusive. As a result, relatively few homes, appliances and other consumer goods are actually IoT-enabled and connected.

In the industrial world, it gets even more complicated because of the nature of the investments. Capital equipment that has been in the field for 20 years or more is not always a viable target for replacement, as a stove or refrigerator may be in the consumer world. Retrofitting is often the only realistic solution to bring IoT capabilities to existing equipment. However, retrofitting is neither simple nor assured. While connecting legacy equipment and systems offers big benefits and is an important step in the IoT initiatives at many industrial companies, the hurdles to implementation can be formidable.

That said, companies are making important strides in this area. They’re adding stand-alone sensors and cameras to existing environments and devices to monitor and collect data about machine performance and health. These sensors attach directly to existing devices and connect to gateways to securely collect and transmit data, which can then be analyzed and used to help prevent failures and downtime.

As Rich Rogers, SVP, product and engineering, industrial IoT portfolio at Hitachi Vantara, explains: “There’s a whole bunch of legacy stuff out there that needs to be integrated, and we’re looking at the best ways to do that. We’re thinking of a Fitbit-like approach for industrial machines. If legacy machines don’t have sensors built into them today, how can we attach them in a cost-effective manner? Doing so would enable us to begin measuring things like vibration, temperature, the climate where the machine is deployed, dust in the air and other factors. Cameras also play a big role, enabling companies, through a common platform, to pop open a video and get a real-time sense for where a machine is and how it’s being used.”

  1. Managing Complexity: Protocol Proliferation

Another big challenge in the deployment of the IIoT is the vast number of protocols. Some of the more common standards include:

  • BLE (Bluetooth low energy)
  • ZigBee
  • Z-Wave
  • Thread
  • We-Mo

In some ways, BLE, ZigBee, Z-Wave and Thread are similar. They’re all wireless technologies that use mesh networks to wirelessly connect and network IoT devices without involving a cellular or Wi-Fi signal. But they differ in the radio frequency they use, their operating range and the number of devices they can support at a given time. We-Mo, however, does require Wi-Fi, which eliminates the need for a hub or controller, and allows devices to connect directly via the internet. Two of the big disadvantages of this system are that it requires significantly more power and processing capability than other, lower-energy options.

Again, this is just a short list; the number of protocols is extensive. Each has its advantages and drawbacks, but since there is no single common standard, companies must determine the right protocol for each use case and ensure the technologies they choose are compatible with their overall platform. As standards continue to evolve, it may be advantageous to replace or upgrade along the way.

Read More Here

Article Credit: Forbes

Go to Source

The Top 8 IoT Trends For 2018

The Top 8 IoT Trends For 2018

An IHS survey estimates that there are 20 billion connected devices globally as of this year. Will 2018 be “The Year of IoT”? Not exactly, but the future looks promising and 2018 will show a promising trajectory.

The Top 8 IoT Trends For 2018, Despite the huge gains in connectivity, the truth is 2018 will be more of a steady (rather than explosive) growth period for the IoT, full of fits and spasms, and everything that goes along with them. It will see lots of investment—lots of growth—and widespread adoption in a few major industries. But it will also see some growing pains—“fragmentation frustration,” potential data breaches, and security issues galore.

So, will 2018 be an exciting year? Yes-ish. The truth is, we’re right smack in the midst of a revolution—no matter how imperfect it may initially seem. If that isn’t exciting, I don’t know what is. The following are the top eight trends we’ll see in the coming year.

1. The IoT Will Grow: In what might be the most obvious prediction of the decade, the IoT will continue to expand next year, with more and more devices coming online every single day. What isn’t so obvious about this prediction: where that growth will occur. The retail, healthcare, and industrial/supply chain industries will likely see the greatest growth. Forrester Research has predicted the IoT will become “the backbone” of customer value as it continues to grow. It is no surprise that retail is jumping aboard, hoping to harness the power of the IoT to connect with customers, grow their brands, and improve the customer journey in deeply personal ways. But industries like healthcare and supply are not far behind. They’re using the technology to connect with patients via wearable devices, and track products from factory to floor. In many ways, the full potential of the IoT is still being realized; we’ll likely see more of that in 2018.

2. It Will Also Become More Fragmented: Just as the IoT continues to grow, it will also become increasingly fragmented. As we’ve seen with the growth of as-a-Service (PaaS) programs and cloud solutions, that fragmentation will create some hurdles for many companies, as they deal with compatibility issues throughout their industries. Though companies like Qualcomm are leading the push for IoT device standards and certifications, in many ways, the genie has already left the bottle. It’s now a matter of wrangling her back into place if we want to put those standards in place.

3. Which Leads to Greater Security Concerns: I’ve said it before, but fragmentation leads to system compromise. Almost every time. The more complex, the more network security challenges. Indeed, securing all these connected devices in an environment with minimal regulation will be difficult. Finding a solution to keep data safe will be a main goal in the coming year.

The Top 8 IoT Trends For 2018

Read More Here

Article Credit: Forbes

Go to Source

Cloud Computing Service Models

Cloud Computing Service Models. Cloud computing is a model for empowering omnipresent, handy, on-demand community access into a shared pool of configurable computing tools (e.g., servers, networks, storage, software, and solutions) that may be quickly provisioned and introduced with minimal direction effort or support supplier interaction. This cloud model consists of five fundamental features, three support models, and four installation versions.

Software as a Service (SaaS)

The capacity given to the consumer would be to use the supplier’s software working on a cloud infrastructure2. The applications are available from several client devices through a thin client interface, like an internet browser (e.g., online email), or even a software interface. The user doesn’t control or manage the inherent cloud infrastructure such as servers, network, operating systems, storage, as well as individual program capacities, together with the possible exception of restricted user-specific application configuration preferences.

Platform as a Service (PaaS)

The capacity given to the consumer would be to set up on the cloud infrastructure consumer-created or obtained applications made using programming languages, libraries, services, and resources supported by the supplier.3 The user doesn’t control or manage the inherent cloud infrastructure such as servers, network, operating systems, or storage, however, has command over the installed software and potentially configuration settings to the application-hosting atmosphere.

Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS)

The capacity given to the consumer would be to supply storage, processing, networks, along with other basic computing tools where the user can deploy and run the random software, which may include things like operating systems and software. The user doesn’t control or manage the inherent cloud infrastructure but has control over operating systems, storage, and installed software; and may be restricted control of pick networking elements (e.g., server firewalls).

Hope now you have a better understanding of Cloud Computing Service Models.

EIN ORIGINAL 

Go to Source