Top ERP Systems – Definitive Pricing Guide 2018

Top ERP Systems

Top ERP Systems

Zero in on the best ERP systems for your company. This guide provides:

• The cost structures for cloud or on-premise implementations
• Costs for users and inclusion of key modules such as CRM, HR, Project Management, Purchasing, Analytics, etc.
• The costs for customization, data migration, building dashboards and other services
• The type of training that is offered, and what included free
• Costs for support, maintenance, upgrades and renewal
• Key limitations for each of the top solutions that might affect your decision
• Expert recommendations and personalized pricing based on your specific needs

SelectHub is a cloud-based platform for Technology Selection Management (TSM). A “best practice” workflow guides you through the entire software selection process-from requirements gathering to product evaluations and RFI/RFPs – to final vendor selection.

Want help with your shortlist? Connect with SelectHub to expedite your ERP software search with free recommendations based on our expert software evaluations and feedback from actual buyers.

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Article Credit: Computer World

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Microsoft partner Sable37 moves Sydney food packer TNA Solutions to Dynamics 365

Microsoft partner Sable37

Microsoft partner Sable37

Sydney Microsoft partner Sable37 has deployed Dynamics 365 for food processing and packaging equipment manufacturer TNA Solutions, replacing its legacy enterprise resource planning (ERP) software.

TNA, which is based in Sydney, provides start-to-finish food processing and packaging solutions and employs 600 staff across 30 countries. Its offerings include materials handling, cooling and freezing, distribution, and end of line solutions.

“Overhauling our ERP system is a significant project for the business. It was equally critical to have the right platform and the right partner. We were not looking for a vendor to come in and replace a system but a company willing to partner with us on the journey to growing our business,” TNA chief information officer Pravin Singh said.

“Sable37 demonstrated their extensive experience with the platform and delivering value to businesses in our industry, and this assured us they were the right partner for us.”

The company said its decision to move to the cloud-based Microsoft Dynamics 365 was to provide a single, secure stable environment to help manage the end-to-end manufacturing process, helping executives make decisions.

A spokesperson for Sable37 told CRN that it replaced an old version of on-premises Microsoft Dynamic AX, deployed by a different reseller.

TNA will also integrate its existing customer engagement solution (CRM) with the new ERP in the future, enabling its sales team to coordinate with the rest of the business, capture leads and make offers to customers.

“We are excited about providing the business with critical information around cash flow, business processes, targets, all from a single system. Microsoft Dynamics 365 delivers all of this functionality out of the box and that’s going to be such a significant change for the business,” Singh said.

“The reporting capabilities of [Microsoft Dynamics 365’s] Power BI and the visibility that offers to our teams is unparalleled and it will propel our growth plans. For a global business like ours, a cloud-based software that transcends borders enables our staff to access one single source of truth, so they are no longer working in silos or reliant on manual processes.”

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Article Credit: CRN

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CFOs get argument for moving on-premises ERP systems to cloud

Cloud services can boost the nation’s productivity by making advanced tech widely available. The cloud will be the major conduit to AI and other tools, a new report says.

on-premises ERP systems

on-premises ERP systems

Businesses that believe their on-premises ERP systems are a cost-effective option may be wrong. Cloud-based ERP systems promise productivity, with access to advanced capabilities, such as artificial intelligence tools, according to a new report.

A problem in increasing productivity is getting businesses access to the advanced tools they need. That’s something cloud services can do, which is part of the argument made in the report by Michael Mandel, senior fellow at the Mack Institute for Innovation Management at the Wharton School in Philadelphia. Mandel has a doctorate in economics from Harvard.

“Productivity has been doing terribly,” Mandel said in an interview. Productivity declined in 2016 and increased by 1.2% in 2017.

“That’s sort of the big problem at this point,” Mandel said. “We’ve had all these advances in technology, and we haven’t moved the needle on the overall productivity number.”

Mandel’s paper was sponsored by Oracle, which is working with its customers to shift, for instance, on-premises ERP to a cloud service. Indeed, Mandel’s report, titled “Intelligent Finance: How CFOs Can Lead the Coming Productivity Boom,” is aimed at finance executives who will play a leading role in arguing for a shift off an on-premises ERP system or for adoption of more automation.

Tech’s role in productivity debated

There has been much debate about the reasons for weak productivity growth. Some of the blame has fallen on the tech industry for overselling the impact of its products.

Critics like Robert Gordon, an economist at Northwestern University, have argued that the tech industry is producing “smaller, smarter and more capable products,” but is not changing productivity or the standard of living in the way electrification or automobiles changed it. Gordon’s book, The Rise and Fall of American Growth, argued that productivity growth faces a number of challenges.

Mandel disagreed, and he said he believes tech is about to have a much different impact on productivity and that a major shift is underway. The report sees cloud services contributing $2 trillion in gross domestic product growth over the next decade.

For this growth to happen, two major things have to occur. First, advanced technologies have to be widely available and accessible to a broad range of businesses. Second, these technologies have to be easy to use and adopt.

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Article Credit: TechTarget

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Users to benefit from next-gen ERP solutions

next-gen ERP

next-gen ERP

EXISTING enterprise resource planning (ERP) software has a particular linear quality to it. Business has always talked about a customer “journey” and this has led to a concept of a chronological movement of an item or service’s through the business –inquiry through to invoice.

This transactional approach was reflected in the first ERP systems, as far back as the 1990s from, for instance, JD Edwards, Oracle or Baan, where the systems’ roots in MRP (manufacturing resource planning) were clearly apparent.

But thanks at least in part to the proliferation of technology that now plays such an intrinsic part in our lives, for an enterprise to really thrive today, it needs to act with several business models running concurrently. Demands on the enterprise which ten years ago would have seemed extraordinary are every day, now.

Today’s customers’ expectations of everything-as-a-service (XaaS) means that the organization supplying goods or services to consumers and other businesses alike needs to be able to offer products in a subscription model, on an annual stipend basis, as a one-off purchase, as a purchase with optional add-ons, or, any combination of those! It’s what customers, partners, and suppliers expect, and it’s what the enterprise needs to provide.

This situation brings us back to the failings of old-school ERP software. Although the transactional, chronological basis for some commercial activity needs preserving (order – produce – invoice – receive payment – repeat), a good ERP has to reflect the adjustment that its users have to make.

CRMs such as Salesforce are good – very good – at marketing, sales, and services, but are unable to extend customer service levels to the next plateau. Today’s enterprise needs to add, to a system such as Salesforce, the ability to cope with finances (“what’s this charge on my account?”), services (“where are we in the project to date?”) and the supply chain (“when is the shipment due at our distribution center?”).

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Article Credit: Techwire

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Bitcoin Price Tops $10K Across Major Exchanges

Bitcoin Price

Bitcoin Price

Bitcoin’s price is back above $10,000 for the first time since December of last year, shortly after it had charted a course to record highs near $20,000.

Since the Feb. 6 low around $6,116 (as per CoinMarketCap) – a correction that saw bitcoin lose 69.5 percent of its value from the all-time high – the cryptocurrency has slowly gained altitude despite media headlines and prominent figures in finance calling the correction a bubble in collapse.

As of press time, the price of bitcoin is trading at $10,037.51, according to CoinDesk‘s Bitcoin Price Index (BPI). Overall, the price of bitcoin has risen more than $500 since the day’s open.

According to CoinDesk‘s Bitcoin Price Index, bitcoin opened the session today at $9,477 and climbed steadily through the day, bar a brief drop around 10:00 UTC. The $10,000 mark was reached at around 17:25 UTC.

Market data indicates that price action on exchanges like GDAX saw the push above $10,000, with a notable green candle emerging. Bitstamp, itBit and Kraken, among others, also saw the price pop past $10,000.

And signs appear strong the price may hold.

Following the $10,000 crossover, traders appear to have been able to tend off sell orders. A view of the minute-by-minute action reveals bears sought to capitalize on bitcoin’s boost, selling the price back below $10,000.

However, data from GDAX shows the price followed through to return to the green.

At press time, bitcoin’s recovery is also reflected across the wider cryptocurrency markets, with digital assets across the board seeing gains today after major losses through January and February. Amid the rebound, tokens like litecoin and ripple (XRP) are doing especially well in the top 10 by market cap.

Litecoin is up 50 percent over the week, while XRP is up 48 percent.

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Article Credit: CoinDesk

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Bitcoin recovering to $10,000 could bring in new buyers

Bitcoin recovering to $10,000

Bitcoin recovering to $10,000

In a sentiment-driven market like bitcoin, key price levels such as $10,000 appear to attract new buyers and help the price.

Bitcoin climbed back above $10,000 Thursday for the first time in two weeks. The cryptocurrency had lost two-thirds of its value in a rapid plunge from a record high above $19,000 in mid-December to a low below $6,000 last week.

But thanks to regulators’ statements that have alleviated fears of heavy-handed crackdown, bitcoin has begun to recover and some analysts see the psychologically key level as a trigger for new buyers to come into the market.

“For most of December and all of January investors were focused on a regulatory crackdown, mostly in Asia,” said Brian Kelly, a CNBC contributor and head of BKCM, which runs a digital assets strategy for clients. “That all changed when CFTC Commissioner Giancarlo spoke at the Senate Banking Committee and changed the regulatory tone. It appears the negative regulatory news is behind us and investors feel more confident investing.”

Bitcoin first topped $10,000 on Nov. 28 as interest in the cryptocurrency surged.

Coinbase, the leading U.S. marketplace for buying major cryptocurrencies, added about 300,000 users in the week around Thanksgiving, bringing the total to more than 13 million, according to public data. That helped send bitcoin from around $8,000 to above $10,000, and rapidly accelerate gains to its high above $19,000 in just three weeks.

For UK-based online trading platform eToro, 60 to 70 percent of its business has involved cryptocurrencies since December, according to UK managing director Iqbal Gandham. The company said it now has 9.5 million users globally, mostly in cryptocurrency trading.

Gandham said user growth slowed down through the end of January — which was when bitcoin began dropping significantly. But he said the rate of withdrawals has not increased, indicating that users were not selling out and that demand from new customers may have helped previous price gains.

Now as bitcoin attempts to hold onto $10,000 again, that may spur more buying.

“When it originally hit 10,00 in November, it created a new dialogue about bitcoin and cryptocurrencies — almost what it was like 25 years ago about having an email address — that has translated into new entrants pouring into the space to participate in this new frontier at the intersection of technology and finance,” said Matt Roszak, co-founder of enterprise blockchain development company Bloq.

Roszak compared the recent slump in bitcoin’s price to historical performance around similar psychologically key milestones of say $1, $10 or $100.

“Each time these milestones have been hit, it introduced a new audience of participants and developers,” Roszak said, noting that a key difference now is that hedge funds are increasingly interested in bitcoin.

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Article Credit: CNBC

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The top 4 industrial enterprise requirements of IoT application enablement platforms (AEP)

Relying on hands-on usability and functionality tests to understand IoT AEPs is the best way to differentiate the true capabilities of platforms on the market.

industrial enterprise requirements of IoT application

industrial enterprise requirements of IoT application

With over 400 self-proclaimed IoT platforms in the market, it doesn’t surprise me that industrial enterprises are hindered trying to identify, test and select a high quality IoT platform. Platform vendors’ marketing materials contain the same messages, their RFX responses always affirm “full compliance” with all requested capabilities and they have partnerships with the same cloud vendors. With over 400 self-proclaimed IoT platforms in the market, the only way to truly know each platform is to use it.

What makes a great IoT AEP?

An Application Enablement Platform (AEP) is a technology-centric offering optimized to deliver a best-of-breed, industry-agnostic, extensible middleware core for building a set of interconnected or independent IoT solutions for customers. An AEP links IoT devices and applications, delivering data to allow industrial enterprises to implement predictive maintenance, machine learning, factory automation, asset logistics, surveillance and many other applications. With IoT platform revenue slated to grow to USD 63.4 billion by 2026, IoT application enablement is one of the most highly demanded enterprise IoT platforms.

Industrial enterprises like heavy equipment manufacturers, petrochemical firm, robotics manufacturers and others spend a tremendous amount of time using their IoT platforms. According to hands-on tests of IoT platforms in MachNation’s IoT Test Environment (MIT-E), an enterprise user will spend an average of 61 minutes executing 7 of the most common IoT data management tasks on an IoT platform. However, an enterprise user can complete these seven tasks in only 10 minutes on the best designed IoT platform while spending 181 minutes on the most cumbersome platforms.

These tasks include:

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Why IoT needs startup studios

Why IoT needs startup studios

Why IoT needs startup studios

The idea of startup studios is becoming more popular, and with good reason. There are fundamental repeatable processes that can equate to substantial leverage when creating a startup from within a studio. And the idea that the internet of things is a significant and broad advance of technology in our world is no longer up for debate. It’s not a fad; it’s real and here to stay. That said, we still see mountains of IoT pilot projects and far, far fewer production IoT examples, much less ones that are fully integrated and compliant with the organization’s larger information technology architecture. By looking a little deeper into why the startup studio model is gaining steam, and why the broader IoT market is struggling in moving from pilots to production, we can spot a correlation that re-enforces the idea of the studio model for IoT.

Aren’t studios like WeWork?

Let’s start with a basic definition of a studio. Many people conflate the idea of a “tech incubator,” of which there are many, to include studios. Incubators generally begin with shared working space environments where there are general resources, like offices, cubes, internet access, meeting rooms, etc., where small startups work in order to access the infrastructure without building themselves. But good incubators will also be the site for tech meetups, additional resources like beer taps and ping pong tables designed to create the right “vibe” for young tech companies, and may even include entrepreneurs in residence as mentors, or access to service providers, like venture investors, lawyers, accountants or more. A studio, by contrast, may or may not be located in an incubator, but operates under a completely different charter. The studio is a company. It is a team of people who work together to start companies. The studio team will have a range of skills applicable to any startup, so for example, this might include CEO, CFO, chief product officer, CTO and probably a VP of sales, bus dev and/or marketing. But the studio team applies its collective knowledge across its portfolio of companies with the express goal of getting these companies funded or sold, whereby they move from the studio to a bigger and better opportunity.

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Article Credit: TechTarget

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Small wake-up receivers could extend IoT sensor life

Ultrasonic signaling that triggers sensors to switch on or off could add to efficiency efforts being made in IoT design, researchers at Stanford University say.

extend IoT sensor life

extend IoT sensor life

One of the potential hindrances to ubiquitous Internet of Things (IoT) take-up is related to how one should power the possibly billions of tiny sensors promised over time. Can one expect a homeowner to change out a hundred or so coin batteries every few years in, say, a networked system, for example? That could get old fast.

The same problem arises at an industrial level. Changing out sensor batteries in a remote installation is equally difficult to achieve, although for different reasons — you need to transport expensive people there to do it, for one thing.

Consequently, there’s a quest for efficiencies. I’ve written before about using radio-waves themselves to power the sensors, as an example.

IoT power-saving solution

Another power-saving solution available to IoT is to make sensors sleep when they’re not being used. You then wake them up when you need them. One way to do that can be by shooting a radio pattern at them: the radio signature simply turns on the sensor.

Google to acquire Xively IoT platform from LogMeIn for $50M

Google to acquire Xively

Google to acquire Xively

Google announced today that it intends to buy Xively from LogMeIn for $50 million, giving Google Cloud an established IoT platform to add to their product portfolio.

In a blog post announcing the acquisition, Google indicated it wants to use this purchase as a springboard into the growing IoT market, which it believes will reach 20 billion connected things by 2020. With Xively they are getting a tool that enables device designers to build connectivity directly into the design process while providing a cloud-mobile connection between the end user app and the connected thing, whatever that happens to be.

“This acquisition, subject to closing conditions, will complement Google Cloud’s effort to provide a fully managed IoT service that easily and securely connects, manages and ingests data from globally dispersed devices,” Antony Passemard from Google wrote in the blog post.

As for LogMeIn, they acknowledged in their company blog post announcing the deal that they intend to exit the IoT space. “So the obvious question is, does this mean LogMeIn is exiting the IoT? Well, if you mean the IoT connectivity platform space, yes, we’re leaving it. We believe that Google Cloud, now armed with Xively’s team and great technology – and backed by their platform and developer heritage and reach – are a far better fit for the future of platform leadership,” they wrote. They are probably right about that.

The company purchased Jive Communications just last week in a signal that they were going to concentrate on unified communications. “Last week, we announced a deal to acquire Jive Communications – a deal that will bring together LogMeIn’s renowned portfolio of collaboration apps like GoToMeeting and join.me with one of the best cloud telephony services on the market,” they wrote in the blog post.

As for Google, it gives the cloud business a stronger foothold in IoT with an established platform, and engineering talent, which over time could help build their cloud business further. Earlier this month, Google announced that its combined cloud business was generating $1 billion per quarter. They need to find ways to expand that business to compete with the likes of AWS, Microsoft and other cloud market leaders. This purchase could be a step in helping them to do that. Internet of Things devices require many different types of cloud resources to build, run and manage the devices and all of the data they are generating.

They believe that by combining Xively’s platform with Google’s security, analytics, machine learning and ability to scale, they can give customers the tools to build IoT applications on their cloud platform.

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Article Credit: TechCrunch

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